Author Topic: Third Trip, First Hiccup  (Read 11045 times)

Offline Reinz

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Re: Third Trip, First Hiccup
« Reply #45 on: June 24, 2011, 05:58:28 AM »
Quote


9mm NATO is 124gr

9mm NATO vs. 9mm Luger
Posted on April 3, 2009 by Caleb
Now thatís a fun topic right there Ė as in, whatís the difference between ammo thatís loaded to 9mm NATO pressures and ammo thatís loaded to 9mm Luger pressures? †First off, you have to establish that there is a difference, because there are people out there who will fight and argue that NATO spec ammo is exactly the same as commercial 9mm Luger. †Itís not, trust me. †Aside from the obvious difference in bullet weight (9mm NATO is 124 grain, most commercial plinking 9mm ammo is 115 grain) rounds that are loaded to NATO spec are loaded to a higher pressure than rounds loaded to industry standard.

From Cartridges of the World, 9th Edition page 482:
Cartridge, Caliber 9mm Ball, NATO, M882

Weapon: Pistol, Automatic, Cal 9mm, M9, M11

Velocity: 1251 +/-25 fps at 16 meters
Pressure: 27,000 psi, max. avg.
Cartridge: 179 gr.
Case: 42 gr.
Bullet: 124 gr Copper Alloy
Propellant:
Brand: HPC 26
Type: Double Base Flake
Weight: 5 gr. 6 gr.
Point Ident: Plain Tip
 † † † † †

Thanks for the correction!

So this makes me wonder, is 124 nato the gold standard of 9mm now or is 115 still the gold standard ?
NRA- LIFE  TSRA- LIFE  SASS-LIFE

Offline ACP

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Re: Third Trip, First Hiccup
« Reply #46 on: June 24, 2011, 10:34:46 AM »
Thanks for posting the 700 Nitro in action. Cartridges of the World addresses this cartridge as "overkill" and you can see why.

I do not begrudge powerful cartridges; it's just not my taste. My favortie pistol and revolver cartridges, respectively, are "normal"; .45ACP and 44 Special.
Those who turn their guns into plowshares end up plowing for those that do not - Thomas Jefferson

Offline kjtrains

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Re: Third Trip, First Hiccup
« Reply #47 on: June 24, 2011, 10:47:20 AM »
The overkill factor could be one of the reasons the 700 Nitro is no longer made and I read somewhere that economic conditions of the times also could have had a presence in discontinuing the production.

This gun cost a huge amount to make and just was not feasible to continue making.
Let us have faith that right makes might, and in that faith, let us, to the end, dare to do our duty as we understand it.  Abraham Lincoln

Offline ACP

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Re: Third Trip, First Hiccup
« Reply #48 on: June 24, 2011, 05:01:03 PM »
Good point. Economic times have found their way into other realms of my collecting interests, to include antiques, pottery and fine art.

The collecting world is usually informed by a simple premise that "quality sells", even in a down market. The reason is not difficult to understand; witness gold which is a hedge against the failing dollar.

As I understand it, (and I believe multiple references have been made on this string), a double rifle is one of the most expensive firearms on the market.

While you can get one cheap, between $25,000 and $50,000, from Beretta or Merkel, if you go for the big time British double rifle (Purdey, Griffen & Howe) you can easily spend $100,000.
Those who turn their guns into plowshares end up plowing for those that do not - Thomas Jefferson