Author Topic: Titanium Frame  (Read 15585 times)

Offline riffraff

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Titanium Frame
« on: July 09, 2006, 08:59:32 PM »
I just don't trust the Aluminum frame to hold up for years and years.  I know it would cost quite a bit more but I would like to see a Rohrbaugh with a Titanium frame.  The weight of the Rohrbaugh is not an issue for me it is the size and proportions and smooth edges that I like so the added weight of a Titamium frame would not bother me at all.

Mike
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Offline Fud

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2006, 12:14:28 PM »
Sounds like an EXCELLENT idea to me.

Offline PsychoSword

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2006, 03:12:49 AM »
A titanium framed R9S would be AWESOME.

Offline PursuitSS

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2006, 12:51:20 PM »
Better yet......................an ALL titanium Rohrbaugh!

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Offline riffraff

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2006, 02:49:56 PM »
PersuitSS,

Yes it would be the ultimate but I bet an all Titanium R9S would cost at least $4000.00.  That would be just a little to spendy for just about anyone.

I am going to guess and say a titanium frame would boost the cost of an R9S to at least $1500.00.

Also the lower weight of the slide would maybe cause some difficulties and require major reengineering(the timeing of the cycle would change, heavier slide springs would be required, etc.).  I just don't know if a titanium slide is really doable given the incredibly small proportions of the R9.

Mike
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Offline Fud

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2006, 09:29:24 PM »
Quote
Also the lower weight of the slide would maybe cause some difficulties and require major reengineering(the timeing of the cycle would change, heavier slide springs would be required, etc.).  I just don't know if a titanium slide is really doable given the incredibly small proportions of the R9.
If I am not mistaken, the slide is made out of steel and titanium is lighter than steel. Heavier than the metal alloy presently used but still lighter than steel. So, would that really be an issue?

Offline PsychoSword

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2006, 11:09:15 PM »
You think it would cost $4,000? k...

He said all titanium, not all gold.

I don't know if titanium has the necessary mass to act as a slide. I think it's too light.

But I'm not a gun engineer. Titanium frame with stainless slide would be good.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2006, 11:10:22 PM by PsychoSword »

Offline theirishguard

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2006, 10:08:15 AM »
I have seen 1911 Colt light weight Commanders hold up for years after firing thousands of rounds, no cracks.
Tom
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Offline riffraff

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2006, 08:44:58 PM »
Psychosword,

Working with titanium is a whole nother ballgame.  The titanium would have to be in a soft a state as possible and when the slide was finished it would have to be heat treated.  Anyway, I am no engineer but it would be much more complicated than to just mill the slide out of titanium.  I also think you are right in that a titanium slide would not have the necessary mass.  A titanium frame on the other hand could be cast and probably must be cast because to mill a frame from titanium would be a long slow process.
I am no engineer.  Who knows a thing or two about titanium

Come to think of it, if not a titanium frame how about a Scandium frame.

Tom,  about the Colt lightweight Commanders holding up for thousands of rounds, I believe you but I have examined the R9 frame and it is scary thin is some places that I would feel better about if they were thicker.

Mike
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Offline PsychoSword

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #9 on: August 15, 2006, 11:27:56 PM »
Could be wrong, but as far as I know S&W has the exclusive rights to produce scandium guns. Either that, or they're the only ones that have a line on getting the scandium to produce the guns. I've heard it comes from Russia.

Offline IDM

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #10 on: September 13, 2006, 01:09:44 AM »
Hey all
New to the site. Good topic.
I have a few 8-10 years of carbon fiber, Kevlar, and Ti design and manufacturing.
This to me would be great gun with a lower in ti. for proto types the way to go is cnc it. But for a production it would need to be cast to keep cost down. $4000 is a little steep,. I think I could build a proto for that.
The other possible ti process is powder sintering. Its kinda like a casting but not. yoi takr ti powder and compress it into a mold with vary high pressure. Then it is put in a oven and taken to just below melting point. The ti particals bond to each other creating the part. It come out about 80% the normal strenght of billet but that should not be a isssue. The other plus to this is that it is a little lighter than billet ti because it has a bit of porosity to it.
Any way sorry for the long 2 cents
Ill have a chance in a week or so to get my hand on a R9.
Im getting one from Tom in a week or so.
Thanks tom

Bryce
« Last Edit: September 13, 2006, 01:11:12 AM by IDM »
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Offline TXAGGIECHL

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #11 on: September 13, 2006, 01:47:35 AM »
Powder casting with Ti sounds a lot like how they make MIM parts.  Does powder casting have the same problems as MIM if not done correctly?

Offline IDM

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #12 on: September 13, 2006, 03:26:47 AM »
What type of problems are you speaking of ?
Being brittle or bad spots, is what Im assuming you are speaking of?
The powder proccess is alot better because you dont get the voids in the part because of the cooling of the metal as it enters the mold cavity. The compression takes care of the voids.
Bryce
« Last Edit: September 13, 2006, 03:37:54 AM by IDM »
Bryce Proctor
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Predator and Predator B  Mfg. Engineer


Offline IDM

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2006, 12:09:40 PM »
I dont remember but one of the big motorcycle mfg's use the powder procces for one of the engine side case's.
Ktm or Handa  dirt bikes I think.
Bryce
Bryce Proctor
Owner IDM llc
Predator and Predator B  Mfg. Engineer


Offline Ubik380

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #14 on: September 13, 2006, 06:03:55 PM »
I seem to recall that some kinds of bearings are made with the powder method because the porosity allows lubricants to build up in the part itself. Anyone know if this is true?