Author Topic: Titanium Frame  (Read 14258 times)

Offline Fud

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #15 on: September 14, 2006, 08:18:35 AM »
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Could be wrong, but as far as I know S&W has the exclusive rights to produce scandium guns. Either that, or they're the only ones that have a line on getting the scandium to produce the guns. I've heard it comes from Russia.
They don't have an exclusive right to produce scandium guns. They have an exclusive supply of scandium from one of the former Soviet Union countries.

Offline TXAGGIECHL

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #16 on: September 14, 2006, 08:33:15 AM »
Actually, the main source of scandium is from military stockpiles from the former Soviet Union, which were themselves extracted from uranium tailings. There is no primary production in the Americas or Europe.
(from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scandium)

Offline riffraff

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #17 on: September 17, 2006, 06:55:44 PM »
I believe, but an not sure, that what Smith and Wesson calls their Scandium guns actually are an alloy of Scandium and Aluminum.  Scandium greatly strenghtens Aluminum somehow.  I don't know the specifics as I am not an engineer or a metalurgist.  This is what I have heard, is this correct or not?

Mike

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« Last Edit: September 17, 2006, 07:03:23 PM by riffraff »
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Offline TXAGGIECHL

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #18 on: September 17, 2006, 07:08:53 PM »
Scandium does some neat stuff when mixed with aluminum in regards to changing and strengthening aluminum's properties.  
Similar to how a pinch yeast makes a pound of dough rise.

Offline Aglifter

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #19 on: December 04, 2006, 10:35:34 PM »
yeah, it's actually a tiny bit of scandium added to the aluminum -- really increases the strength -- I think I might have had some race parts for a sailboat made in that powder method.  Real "foamy" looking aluminum, didn't do too badly corrosion-wise, but eventually got too weakened, and cracked up -- might be something else, too.  It was really weird stuff made to be as light as possible -- which was dumb, weakened critical parts of the boat to save ~1.5#s of a 10M boat.
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Offline PsychoSword

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #20 on: February 25, 2007, 02:03:38 PM »
I wish this idea would get some wings, I know alot of people would love to see a titanium or scandium framed version. Or even a stainless steel frame.

It would be nice to have a more durable version of the Rohrbaugh R9s available for purchase.

Offline Fud

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #21 on: February 25, 2007, 10:39:35 PM »
+1 for the stainless steel frame

Offline PsychoSword

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #22 on: February 26, 2007, 03:24:45 AM »
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+1 for the stainless steel frame


Amen. I would pocket a stainless framed version no problem. It would be heavier, but I know it would still be a damn sight lighter than the MK9 I'm used to pocketing.

Offline TXAGGIECHL

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #23 on: February 26, 2007, 09:44:44 AM »
A fraction more weight could do wonders for reliability.

Offline Fud

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #24 on: March 03, 2007, 01:56:06 AM »
Anybody from Rohrbaugh listening?

Offline PsychoSword

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #25 on: March 17, 2007, 03:11:45 AM »
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A fraction more weight could do wonders for reliability.


More grip is good too. :)

Offline shakermountain

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #26 on: November 09, 2007, 03:26:08 AM »
Powder Metallurgy is widely used in the auto industry for making everything from fuel filters (this is where the porosity advantage kicks in) to planetary gears for transmissions. In some case the compacts are made of just one alloy, in others alower melting point alloy powder (like copper) is mixed in so the part can be "bonded" at a lower than sintering temp. This can produce incredibly stong, tough, and hard units like the gears. Tungsten alloy parts for aerospace/ military are made exclusively by this method. This would definitely be the way to go if RB could convince the bank that they'd sell 20.000 or more units per mold. 10 to 15 K is usually considered the break-even point in this type of manufacture.

Titanium Frame? I'd shell out 2 grand for one without batting an eye. Seems very doable with a nice margin if they farmed it out. For a gun frame I think simple investment casting would do the trick, considering the lower production numbers.

CNC would work too, but the frame would not be as strong. I'm not sure drop forging would be cost-effective

This new casting process:

http://www.azom.com/details.asp?ArticleID=286

might also work, but would definitely push the cost up to PM comparabiltiy. I'd go with lost wax centrifuge casting to keep the cost down.

So, when does RB start taking orders? `:~>


Offline riffraff

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #27 on: November 09, 2007, 06:10:26 PM »
I have a bad feeling that we are going to see the R380 introduced and the R45 introduced before we see a R9 with a frame other than alluminum alloy.  I don't like it but this is just the feeling I am getting as I hear about all the things that the Rbros are working on.

Mike
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Offline harrydog

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #28 on: January 22, 2008, 08:59:09 AM »
At one time, back in the very early pre-production days of Rohrbaugh, stainless steel and titanium frames were both options being considered. But a couple of years ago I had a conversation with Eric R. and he said that while stainless was still an eventual possibility, it was highly unlikely that a titanium frame version would ever be produced.
Too bad...   :'(
I'm sure Ruger would be more than happy to produce them for Rohrbaugh.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2008, 09:01:39 AM by harrydog »

Offline riffraff

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Re: Titanium Frame
« Reply #29 on: January 22, 2008, 07:07:39 PM »
All,

Yes, I do understand that the Scandium alloy is trademarked by Smith and Wesson. and Titanium is pretty hard to work with and I don't ever expect those items.  I do want a SS OR even a carbon steel lower for the R9.  I know that that is not to much to ask.  I don't want to hear excuses from anybody.  If the R bros don't have the time(which I believe is the big issue) then FARM IT OUT.

Mike
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